September 8, 2014

Fall 2014 Preview
For the PDF version, click here
 

Kazumi Tanaka: Mother and Child Reunion

August 1–November 9, 2014

FWM, 1214 Arch Street, First Floor

Public Reception: Thursday, October 2, 2014 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm
Members-only Artist Talk by Kazumi Tanaka: Thursday, October 2, 2014 at 5:30 pm
 
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) presents new work by Artist-in-Residence Kazumi Tanaka, a Japanese-American sculptor based in Beacon, New York. Kazumi Tanaka: Mother and Child Reunion opened on Friday, August 1, 2014. FWM will host a public reception on Thursday, October 2, 2014 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm, as well as a Members event featuring an artist talk at 5:30 pm on the First Floor at FWM, 1214 Arch Street. This exhibition presents an accumulation of memories, customs, and traditional Japanese fabric processes that tells a story of family, tradition, and one’s self.
 
Kazumi Tanaka: Mother and Child Reunion is the initial exhibition of FWM’s ongoing series, Convergence: Declarations of Independence, which presents to the Philadelphia community the energy and creativity of artists working outside traditional centers of the art world.
 
Major funding for this exhibition is provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, with additional funding by the National Endowment for the Arts, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and the Board of Directors and Members of The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM).
 
About the Artist
Kazumi Tanaka (b. 1962, Osaka, Japan) graduated from Osaka University in 1985 before relocating to New York in 1987, where she studied sculpture at the New York Studio School (1987–1990). Employing both ancient and modern sculpting techniques, Tanaka creates intricate and conceptually complex works that often involve childhood memories of Japan and address cultural differences between Eastern and Western lifestyles. She has exhibited at museums and galleries around the world. Solo exhibitions include presentations at the Kent Gallery between 1995 and 2003; as well as shows at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (1993); Beacon Project Space, Beacon, New York (2002); and Hudson Beach Glass Gallery, Beacon, New York (2011). Tanaka’s work has been included in numerous group exhibitions, including A Labor of Love, at the New Museum of Contemporary Art (1996); The Quiet in the Land, at the Portland Institute of Contemporary Art at the Maine College of Art (1997); Model World at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut (2002); and Salem2Salem, at Neues Museum, Salem, Germany (2012). Most recently, her work has been included in the group exhibition Silence, at Masters & Pelavin Gallery, New York (2012). Tanaka has participated in numerous residencies, including the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Skowhegan, Maine (1990); the United Society of Shakers, Sabbathday Lake, Maine (1996); in Salem, Germany (2010, 2012); Art Omi in New York (2013); and is completing a residency as part of a 2014 Visual Arts Fellowship at the Citivella Ranieri Center in Umbria, Italy. She lives and works in Beacon, New York.
 
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Venturi, Scott Brown and Grandmother: Patterns for Production

September 13–November 9, 2014

FWM, 1214 Arch Street, Eighth Floor

Public Reception: Thursday, October 2, 2014 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm
 
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) presents Venturi, Scott Brown and Grandmother: Patterns for Production that opens on Saturday, September 13, 2014. FWM will host a public reception on Thursday, October 2, 2014 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. This exhibition illustrates the bold commitment to surface pattern and color that distinguished the designs of Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates for textiles, furniture, and decorative arts from the early 1970s to the early 1990s. Both on the walls of the Mt. Airy home shared by architects Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown and at FWM where the Grandmother, Notebook, and Flowers designs were developed, patterns were tested—some floral, some abstract, some combined—the designers skillfully manipulating effects of scale, rhythm, color, and association. These experiments mirrored the working process of Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates for their commercial clients, where the firm’s tendency to continuously modify and refine is recorded in the numerous prototypes and samples produced for every project.
 
Venturi, Scott Brown and Grandmother: Patterns for Production is curated by: Claudia Cueto, AIA, CuetoKEARNEYdesign Architects; Kathryn B. Hiesinger, Ph.D., The J. Mahlon Buck, Jr. Family Senior Curator, European Decorative Arts after 1700, Philadelphia Museum of Art; Marion Boulton Stroud, Founder and Artistic Director, The Fabric Workshop and Museum; and William Whitaker, Curator and Collections Manager, The Architectural Archives, University of Pennsylvania.
 
Major funding for this exhibition is provided by the Edna W. Andrade Fund of The Philadelphia Foundation with additional funding by the Board of Directors and Members of The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM).
 
About the Artists
Venturi, Scott Brown & Associates
Robert Venturi, American, born 1925, lives in Philadelphia
Denise Scott Brown, American, born Zambia 1931, lives in Philadelphia
Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown have been practicing architecture, writing critical architectural theory and teaching together since the mid-1960s. Their award-winning work has influenced new generations of architects and designers, and includes building projects such as the Seattle Art Museum, a new wing for the National Gallery, London, Gordon Wu Hall at Princeton University, as well as Venturi’s early works: Vanna Venturi House in Philadelphia, his mother’s residence, and the facade for Best Products in Oxford Valley, Pennsylvania. Venturi’s theoretical writing has been critical to the development and understanding of postmodern theory in architecture, from Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture, to Learning from Las Vegas, written with Denise Scott Brown and their colleague Steve Izenour. Their four decades of architectural and design work was the subject of a 2001 exhibition organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which traveled to the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, and The Heinz Architectural Center at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh.
 
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Question Bridge: Black Males

September 13–November 9, 2014

FWM, 1214 Arch Street, Second Floor

Public Reception: Thursday, October 2, 2014 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm

 
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) presents Question Bridge: Black Males that opens on Saturday, September 13, 2014. FWM will host a public reception on Thursday, October 2, 2014 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. Question Bridge aims to represent and redefine black male identity in America, and powerfully exposes the incredible diversity of thought, character, and identity within the black American male demographic, disrupting traditional generalizations.
 
This project created by Chris Johnson, Hank Willis Thomas, Bayeté Ross Smith, and Kamal Sinclair explores challenging issues within the black male community by instigating a transmedia conversation across the geographic, economic, generational, educational, and social divisions of American society. These artists collected more than 1,600 question and answer videos from over 150 men across the country between 2008-2011. The conversation that is created brings about healing and understanding among group members, but when it’s shared publicly, understanding happens on a broader scale: non-black viewers are exposed to complex and authentic images of black males rarely seen in American media. The hope is that this exposure will help break down the many negative perceptions people have about black men. Johnson, Thomas, Ross Smith, and Sinclair shaped the content into an insightful, provocative, and entertaining five-channel video installation that has been exhibited at over 30 museums, festivals, and institutions.
 
From the beginning, the goal of the project has been to represent and redefine black male identity by getting large numbers of black men to participate in the effort. So, starting in September 2014, Question Bridge will embark on a campaign of getting 200,000 black males to add their voices through the website and mobile app by summer 2016. This exhibition at FWM is joined by 7 other exhibitions appearing across the country in the fall of 2014.
 
Question Bridge: Black Males is a fiscally sponsored project of the Bay Area Video Coalition (a 501c3 not-for-profit organization) and supported in part by a grant from the Open Society Institute: Campaign for Black Male Achievement, The California Endowment, The Ford Foundation, The Tribeca Film Institute, the LEF Foundation, The Center for Cultural Innovation, Nathan Cummings Foundation and the California College of the Arts. The project was supported by the Sundance Institute’s New Frontier Story Lab.
 
Artist Statement
This is a critical period in history for the African American community. In recent years, many have been able to transcend racial, cultural and economic boundaries while others have found themselves increasingly confined to the margins of society. African American men are particularly challenged by this paradox. A black man is the President of the United States, yet black men are still severely overrepresented in incarceration and high school dropout rates, and suffer disproportionately from various preventable health risks and as victims of homicide.
 
The representation and depiction of black males in popular culture has long been governed by prevailing stereotyped attitudes about race and sexuality. Far too little is known about the range of internal values and dynamics of this group. Scientists, social scientists, theorists, historians, politicians and activists have investigated the plight of the African American male on various levels and from diverse perspectives, yet not enough has been done to represent a multi-faceted and self-determined representation of this demographic. Ultimately Black males’ greatest challenges are with themselves. The question is, “why?”
 
Question Bridge: Black Males opens a window onto the complex and often unspoken dialogue among African American men, creating an intimate and essentially genuine experience for viewers and subjects and providing new opportunities for understanding and healing. This project brings the full spectrum of what it means to be “black” and “male” in America to the forefront. “Blackness” ceases to be a simple, monochromatic concept.
-- Chris Johnson, Hank Willis Thomas, Bayeté Ross Smith, and Kamal Sinclair
 
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Joy Feasley and Paul Swenbeck: A Hatchet to Kill Old Ugly

October 2, 2014–January 4, 2015

The New Temporary Contemporary, 1222 Arch Street

Public Reception: Thursday, October 2, 2014 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm
 
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) presents Joy Feasley and Paul Swenbeck: A Hatchet to Kill Old Ugly, an installation inspired by Shaker spirit drawings and magic, that opens on Thursday, October 2, 2014 with a public reception from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. The exhibition, divided into three parts, derives its title from a Shaker name for the Devil—“Old Ugly”—seen in Spirit Drawings, which the Shakers created to describe symbols seen in visions. The first section of the exhibition, in the front windows of The New Temporary Contemporary at 1222 Arch Street, displays arcane tools used to observe the mysteries of nature for viewers on the street. The main gallery houses what, at first, appears to be a faithful reproduction of a Shaker domestic interior, but is in reality a set for an illusionist performance. Lastly, the back room in the gallery is full of baroque color and light along with strangely magical elements, contrasting the front space’s proto-modernist Shaker austerity. Feasley and Swenbeck propose how science, asceticism, and magic are all possible methods of exploring our world, in an exhibition detailing the artists’ fascination with an invisible world that is all around us.
 
About the Artists
Joy Feasley (b. 1966 in Buffalo, NY), a visual artist, studied painting at Massachusetts College of Art, Boston; The Cooper Union, New York; and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Her paintings are often of intimate scale, and feature vibrant colors and otherworldly landscapes. Feasley’s work has been exhibited at Locks Gallery, Philadelphia (2011, 2009, 2008, 2007); LUMP Gallery, Raleigh, North Carolina (2010, 2003); the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (2007, 1999); Vox Populi, Philadelphia (2002, 2000); and at venues in Tokyo, Japan (2004); Waltham, Massachusetts (2003); and Brooklyn, New York (2001). She is the recipient of a Pew Fellowship (2011) and two Leeway Foundation Window of Opportunity grants (2003, 2001). She is represented by Locks Gallery, and lives and works in Philadelphia.
 
Paul Swenbeck (b. 1967 in Salem, Massachusetts) developed a fascination with the macabre and occult at an early age, which has filtered into his idiosyncratic sculptures, paintings, photographs, and installations. He graduated with a degree in ceramics from Massachusetts College of Art in 1991. Swenbeck’s work has been included in exhibitions at Adams and Ollman (2013), in Portland, Oregon; Fleisher Ollman Gallery (2011, 2010, 2009), the Institute of Contemporary Art (2009, 2004), Vox Populi (2009), and Morris Gallery at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (2005), in Philadelphia; and at Walker Art Center (2009), in Minneapolis. Swenbeck is a recipient of the 2013 Pew Fellowship in the Arts, and is represented by Fleisher Ollman Gallery in Philadelphia. He lives and works in Philadelphia.
 
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ALLORA & CALZADILLA: INTERVALS

Organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and The Fabric Workshop and Museum

December 12, 2014–April 5, 2015

The Levy Gallery and the Skylit Atrium in the Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building, Philadelphia Museum of Art,
and The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia
 
Allora and Calzadilla: Intervals is the first major solo exhibition in Philadelphia by the Puerto Rico-based collective Allora & Calzadilla. Organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) and The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), the exhibition presents a selection of recent projects—most of which have never before been shown in the United States—as well as new works created specifically for the occasion. The exhibition of films, sculpture, sound, and performances unfolds over two sites—the PMA’s Levy Gallery and Skylit Atrium at the Perelman Building, and three floors of The Fabric Workshop and Museum. Working in the space between deep past and contemporaneity, between physical remains and their informational traces, Allora & Calzadilla’s recent and new projects stage a series of encounters between multiple temporalities and diverse actors that unsettle historical time, drawing attention to where and how human and non-human entities come into contact and intersect.
 
Major funding for this exhibition is provided by the Edna W. Andrade Fund of The Philadelphia Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional funding by the Board of Directors and Members of The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM).
 
Curatorial Team
Carlos Basualdo, The Keith L. and Katherine Sachs Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, PMA; Erica F. Battle, The John Alchin and Hal Marryatt Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, PMA; Marion Boulton Stroud, Founder and Artistic Director, FWM; Stephanie  Alison Greene, Head of Exhibitions and Publications, FWM.
 
About the Artists
Jennifer Allora (born 1974, Philadelphia) and Guillermo Calzadilla (born 1971, Havana) have been working in close collaboration on an extensive body of work since 1995. Through a research-based approach, their works trace intersections of history, material culture, and politics through a wide variety of media – namely performance, sculpture, sound, video, and photography. Their work has been exhibited and collected widely in public institutions and private collections.  Recent solo exhibitions include: The Trussardi Foundation, Milan (2013), Indianapolis Museum of Art (2012), the U.S. Pavilion at the 54th Venice Biennale (2011), Museum of Modern Art (2010) Haus der Kunst, Munich (2008), and Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2008). Among numerous group exhibitions, they participated in dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel, Germany (2012); the 24th and 29th São Paulo Biennial (2010) and the 5th, 7th, and 10th Gwangju Biennials. Allora & Calzadilla are represented by Galerie Chantal Crouse, Paris; Gladstone Gallery, New York; Kurimanzutto, Mexico City; and Lisson Gallery, London. They live and work in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
 
Fault Lines, a solo exhibition by Allora & Calzadilla is on view at the Gladstone Gallery, New York from September 13 to October 11, 2014.
 
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About The Fabric Workshop and MuseumThe Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) is the only museum of its kind, offering internationally renowned artists the resources to create new work in experimental materials. Artists come from all media—including sculpture, installation, video, painting, ceramics, and architecture—and use FWM’s facilities and technical expertise to create works of art that they could not create on their own. Research, construction, and fabrication occur onsite in studios that are open to the public, providing visitors with the opportunity to see works of art from conception to completion. FWM’s permanent collections include not only complete works of art, but also material research, samples, prototypes, and photography and video of artists making and speaking about their work. Access to the creative process provides visitors with a point of entry into understanding challenging works of contemporary art. FWM offers an unparalleled experience to those young and old, including the most significant artists of our time, students, and the general public.
 
The programs of The Fabric Workshop and Museum are supported by Agnes Gund; Amy Stone, Art Ancora; The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; The Arcadia Foundation; The Barra Foundation; Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation; Claneil Foundation; The Coby Foundation; The Dedalus Foundation, Inc.; Dolfinger-McMahon Foundation; E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation; Edna W. Andrade Fund of The Philadelphia Foundation; The Honickman Foundation; Independence Foundation; Institute of Museum and Library Services; The Judith Rothschild Foundation; Knight Foundation; LEF Foundation; LLWW Foundation; Longwood Plantation Foundation, Inc.; Louis N. Cassett Foundation; Mondriaan Foundation; Museums ConnectSM made possible by the US Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and administered by the American Alliance of Museums; National Endowment for the Arts; New Millennium Charitable Foundation; The New York Community Trust; Nimoy Foundation; Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency; The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage; The Philadelphia Cultural Fund; PNC Foundation; PNC Arts Alive; Public Funds from the Netherlands Cultural Service; The Quaker Chemical Foundation; Samuel S. Fels Fund; Individual Trustee Discretionary Grant, of the W. Clement and Jessie V. Stone Foundation; Uplands Family Foundation; and the Board of Directors and Members of The Fabric Workshop and Museum.
 
For more information, or to request images, please contact Michele Bregande, Assistant to the Directors, at michele@fabricworkshopandmuseum.org, or 215.561.8888.
 
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