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The Apple of Adam’s Eye, 1993. (front) Pigment and silk Embroidery on cotton sateen, and Australian lacewood. 73 x 81 x 1 3⁄4 inches (185.42 x 205.74 x 4.45 cm). Edition of 5. The Apple of Adam’s Eye, 1993. (back) Pigment and silk Embroidery on cotton sateen, and Australian lacewood. 73 x 81 x 1 3⁄4 inches (185.42 x 205.74 x 4.45 cm). Edition of 5.
The Apple of Adam’s Eye, 1993. (front) Pigment and silk Embroidery on cotton sateen, and Australian lacewood. 73 x 81 x 1 3⁄4 inches (185.42 x 205.74 x 4.45 cm). Edition of 5.
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The Apple of Adam’s Eye, 1993. (back) Pigment and silk Embroidery on cotton sateen, and Australian lacewood. 73 x 81 x 1 3⁄4 inches (185.42 x 205.74 x 4.45 cm). Edition of 5.
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The Apple of Adam's Eye, 1993

Artist: Carrie Mae Weems

Known for her integration of photography and text, Weems has focused her work on universal themes such as relationships and family, while simultaneously commenting on social, cultural and historical realities. She is one of the leading artists to emerge from a period in American art focusing on identity politics. In The Apple of Adam's Eye, Weems retells the biblical story of Adam and Eve. Using a folding screen as her form, Weems worked with the FW+M to silkscreen print a central image of a shrouded woman flanked by side panels depicting a decorative, serpentine vine. Gold text is elaborately embroidered and reads: "She'd always been the apple/Of Adam's Eye" (front panels) and "Temptation my ass, desire has its place, and besides, they were both doomed from the start" (on reverse). The central figure shields herself, yet also reveals part of her body, evoking a sense of sexual tension and raising issues of sexual politics. According to Weems, the figure's poses suggests that, "both men and women are accomplices in their own downfall, in their own oppression, in their own victimization." (Projects: Carrie Mae Weems, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1995)