Janine Antoni, Anna Halprin, Stephen Petronio, Rope Dance, 2015. Photo: courtesy and copyright the artists. Janine Antoni, Anna Halprin, Stephen Petronio, Rope Dance, 2015. Photo: Hugo Glendinning. Janine Antoni in collaboration with Anna Halprin, Paper Dance, 2013. Photographed by: Pak Han at the Halprin Dance Deck. Cortesean and Crone. Photo credit: Mike Dixon. Parades and Changes, UC Berkeley, 1968. Photo credit: Paul Fusco.
Janine Antoni, Anna Halprin, Stephen Petronio, Rope Dance, 2015. Photo: courtesy and copyright the artists.
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Janine Antoni, Anna Halprin, Stephen Petronio, Rope Dance, 2015. Photo: Hugo Glendinning.
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Janine Antoni in collaboration with Anna Halprin, Paper Dance, 2013. Photographed by: Pak Han at the Halprin Dance Deck.
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Cortesean and Crone. Photo credit: Mike Dixon.
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Parades and Changes, UC Berkeley, 1968. Photo credit: Paul Fusco.
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Anna Halprin

Since the late 1930’s Anna Halprin has consistently challenged and revolutionized the dance field. Unsatisfied with the confining label of “modern dance,” Halprin’s work is dedicated to experimental and exploratory movement. This freedom of motion and openness to change has been inspirational for many, and the likes of Meredith Monk, Trisha Brown, and Yvonne Rainer have studied under Halprin. Dancers such as Merce Cunningham and Eiko & Koma, as well as numerous visual artists and poets, have flocked to Halprin’s famous outdoor deck in her Kentfield, CA home as a rich environment for creative investigation.
 
In her own work, which includes 150 full-length pieces of dance theater, Halprin deals with dance's potential to act as a catalyst for personal and social transformation. Particularly through the Tamalpa Institute, co-founded with her daughter Daria Halprin in Marin County, CA in 1978, Halprin brings together dance, visual art, performance, and therapeutic practice in order to tap into the healing capabilities of the expressive arts. Compositions such as Circle Dance and Planetary Dance: A Call for Peace expand their focus beyond the individual, using ritual and community involvement to engage with challenging social issues. Halprin’s work also frequently confronts social norms and challenges the comfort of the audience, as in Parades & Changes, which was initially banned in the United States for its then-radical nudity.  Now working for over 85 years, many of Halprin’s recent works have turned to the subject of age and the beauty of the aging body.
 
Through Ally, a collaboration between visual artist Janine Antoni and Stephen Petronio, a renowned New York-based choreographer, Halprin will continue to test the limits of dance and to mine the possibilities of the expressive arts. Culminating in new collaborative performances that will debut at The Fabric Workshop and Museum in Spring 2016, Ally will provide an opportunity for each artist to explore the boundaries of his or her own genre as well as the possibilities for the combination of visual art, performance art, and dance.
 
Artist Statement
I am engaged in a theatre where everything is experienced as if for the first time: a theater of risk, spontaneity, exposure, and intensity. Since the 1960s, my experiments involve dancing outside the confines of the theatre, in the street or natural world, with unexpected results. As dance comes closer to the places where people live, it connects to people’s lives and responds to people’s needs. I strive to expand the boundaries between art and life and the roles of audience and performer. As a result my dance becomes accessible to more people and the participants become more diverse.
 
I believe in maximizing our differences and discovering our commonalities.  By dancing with real people, I work with real life themes; this has transformative powers, and I consider these dances rituals.
 
I continue to believe in the shining potential set forth by all this work, in its evolution from rebellion to community to healing and back again to the natural world. Our sensory awareness to the environment is a spiritual awakening and can be expressed through movement and the creative process. I go back to the ritualistic beginnings of art as a sharpened expression of life. I seek to make art useful and life artful.
 
What is my vision now that I am 95? What do elders in other cultures do: they teach the young, heal the sick, and mentor the next generation. I have spent my life being touched, and touching others, through the power of dance.

Bio
American, born 1920 in Winnetka, IL, lives and works in Kentfield, CA
 
Graduating with a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1942, Anna Halprin has been called one of the most important theatre artists of the twentieth century. In an attempt to move away from the constraints of modern dance and engage in more exploratory movement, Halprin founded the San Francisco Dancer’s Workshop in 1955. In 1978 she went on to found the Tamalpa Institute, an organization dedicated to movement-based expressive arts healing and therapy, alongside her daughter Daria Halprin. Throughout her expansive career Halprin has received many awards, including a lifetime achievement in choreography from the American Dance Festival, and has been named one of “America’s Irreplaceable Dance Treasures” by The Dance Heritage Coalition. Halprin has also been the subject of an eponymous exhibition at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Lyon, France in 2006, as well as the 2009 documentary, Breath Made Visible.