FWM Executive Director, Susan Lubowsky Talbott. Photo credit: Thibault Jeanson The Fabric Workshop and Museum, 1214 Arch Street, Philadelphia High School Apprentices hand screen-printing at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia, 2011. Photo: Carlos Avendaño Nari Ward: We The People, November 2011, Artist lecture at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) in front of We The People, 2011, In collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia. Used and hand-dyed shoelaces. Photo: Carlos Avendaño Close at Hand, June 2011, Opening reception at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia. Photo Credit: Carlos Avendaño High School Apprentices at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia Mel Chin: Uncommon Wealth by the People of Philadelphia, April 2010, Opening at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia, The Philadelphia Fundred Mint. Photo Credit: Lonnie Graham Nick Cave: Architectural Forest, 2011. High School Apprentices in front of Architectural Forest at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia. Photo Credit: Carlos Avendaño
FWM Executive Director, Susan Lubowsky Talbott. Photo credit: Thibault Jeanson
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The Fabric Workshop and Museum, 1214 Arch Street, Philadelphia
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High School Apprentices hand screen-printing at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia, 2011. Photo: Carlos Avendaño
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Nari Ward: We The People, November 2011, Artist lecture at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) in front of We The People, 2011, In collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia. Used and hand-dyed shoelaces. Photo: Carlos Avendaño
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Close at Hand, June 2011, Opening reception at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia. Photo Credit: Carlos Avendaño
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High School Apprentices at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia
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Mel Chin: Uncommon Wealth by the People of Philadelphia, April 2010, Opening at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia, The Philadelphia Fundred Mint. Photo Credit: Lonnie Graham
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Nick Cave: Architectural Forest, 2011. High School Apprentices in front of Architectural Forest at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia. Photo Credit: Carlos Avendaño
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About FWM

The Fabric Workshop and Museum was founded in 1977 with a visionary purpose: to stimulate experimentation among leading contemporary artists and to share the process of creating works of art with the public. Providing studio facilities, equipment, and expert technicians, FWM originally invited artists to experiment with fabric, and later with a wide range of innovative materials and media. From the outset, FWM also served as an educational center for Philadelphia’s youth. Printing apprenticeship programs provided emerging artists with technical and vocational skills, as well as new approaches to creative expression.

Today, FWM is recognized as an internationally acclaimed contemporary art museum, uniquely distinguished as the only institution in the United States devoted to creating work in new materials and new media in collaboration with artists coming from diverse artistic backgrounds—including sculpture, installation, video, photography, painting, ceramics, and architecture—as part of their celebrated Artist-in-Residence Program. Research, construction, and fabrication occur on site in studios that are open to the public, providing visitors with the opportunity to see artwork from conception to completion.

In addition to works of art created on site, FWM’s permanent collection includes material research, samples, and prototypes. An extensive archive of photographs and video documentation highlights artists making and speaking about their process. FWM seeks to bring this spirit of artistic investigation and discovery to the wider public, remaining particularly dedicated to developing programs and opportunities for local students and emerging artists. Comprehensive educational programming includes lectures, tours, in-school presentations and apprenticeship programs. In advancing the role of art as a catalyst for innovation and social connection, FWM offers an unparalleled experience both to and with the most significant artists of our time.

Marion Boulton Stroud (1939-2015)
Founder and Artistic Director (1977-2015)

Susan Lubowsky Talbott
Executive Director
 
Board of Directors

Officers
Maja Paumgarten Parker, President
Jill Bonovitz, Vice President
Eugene H. Mopsik, Treasurer
Lynn Leonard Hitschler, Secretary
 
Members
Barbara Aronson
Jason Briggs
Ruth Fine
Sarah Jackson
Tim Kearney
Emanuel Kelly
Ann T. Loftus, Esquire
Mary Mather Macgregor
Laurie McGahey
John Ravenal
Joe Rishel
Katherine Sokolnikoff
David Stephens
Cynthia Stroud

 
 
FWM's latest Letter from the Director, published March 2019:
 
Dear Friends,
 
This January, I had the privilege of attending the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) Conference in Richmond, Virginia. I was particularly struck by Bryan Stevenson's powerful keynote address, American Injustice: Mercy, Humanity and Making a Difference. Stevenson is the founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative and author of the critically acclaimed book, Just Mercy. I also toured Monument Avenue, where a series of prominent Confederate statues have instigated a painful and personal debate about the changing role of historical monuments. As FWM prepares for our upcoming exhibition by Sonya Clark, Monumental Cloth, The Flag We Should Know (March 29-August 4, 2019), the conference themes were an especially timely reminder of the historical roots and cultural relevance of Clark's work.
 
In Monumental Cloth, The Flag We Should Know, Clark will debut a series of installations made in collaboration with FWM. The exhibition centers around the Confederate Flag of Truce, a dishcloth that played a crucial role in ending the Civil War as the South's flag of surrender at Appomattox. Beyond returning our attention to this lesser-known cloth turned historical flag—one that brokered peace and promised reconciliation—the exhibition also instigates a role reversal. By presenting the Truce Flag on a monumental scale, Clark aims to correct a historical imbalance with an alternative to the Confederate Battle Flag and its pervasive divisiveness.
 
Over the next six months, Monumental Cloth, The Flag We Should Know will provide an important catalyst for dialogue about the scars of the Confederacy and America's ability to acknowledge and reckon with racial injustice. I'm reminded of Stevenson's address, which encouraged us to challenge the narratives that sustain unjust practices and policies, noting the false narratives of racial difference that justified both genocide against Native Americans and slavery in this country. “I think the great evil of American slavery was the narrative we created to justify it,” Stevenson said. “It’s the ideology of white supremacy that we made up.”
 
In short, Sonya Clark’s show gets at the core of why the cultural symbols we stand behind matter. It's also worth noting that FWM is housed in a former flag factory, a particularly fitting place to ask questions about the symbolic power cloth can hold in the consciousness of our nation. As we collaborate on public programs related to Clark's project with local institutions such as the African American Museum in Philadelphia and Monument Lab, we are proud to stand behind this work as we seek to open new channels and collectively lean in.
 
Sonya Clark: Monumental Cloth, The Flag We Should Know opens to the public on Friday, March 29. On Saturday, March 30, Clark will also activate the gallery with a public performance. In Reversals, dust collected from historical sites in Philadelphia will be wiped away to reveal the Preamble to the United States Declaration of Independence.
 
As FWM brings this spirit of artistic investigation and engaged dialogue to the wider public—advancing the role of art as a hopeful agent for change—we hope you will join us for a spring of exploration and discovery.
 
Sincerely,
 
Susan L. Talbott
Executive Director
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM)
1214 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107-2816
215-561-8888 x222
susan@fabricworkshopandmuseum.org